Nature

Dried spaghetti strands pass through three stages of physical deformation on their way to becoming a toothsome plate of pasta. Credit: Getty Physics 10 January 2020 But the scientific literature remains silent on lasagna. A simple mathematical model can capture the movements of a spaghetti noodle as it curls during cooking. In all but the
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A refinery in Texas City, Texas, makes the widely used chemical mixture called syngas. A new catalyst powers syngas production without the need for very high temperatures. Credit: David Ilzhoefer/Alamy Chemistry 09 January 2020 A doctored catalyst produces a versatile industrial chemical without energy-intensive heating. Add a molecule of carbon dioxide to one of methane,
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Rescue workers sift through the wreckage of a Ukrainian aeroplane that crashed in Tehran.Credit: Mazyar Asadi/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Canadian universities are mourning more than a dozen faculty and students who died when Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 flight crashed in Iran on 8 January. One-hundred seventy-six people were killed when the Boeing 737-800 crashed shortly after
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Two earthquakes hit near a nuclear power plant in southwestern Iran on Wednesday morning. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the first earthquake, measuring 4.9 magnitude, struck just before 9.00 a.m. local time in Bushehr province just 30 miles from the Bushehr nuclear plant. The 2nd quake, a 4.5-magnitude aftershock, struck a half-hour
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African grey parrots bestow favours on others of their species— even those that can’t reciprocate. Credit: Anette Mertens Animal behaviour 09 January 2020 African grey parrots show a type of insightful generosity recorded in only humans, orangutans and a few other species. Humans and some other apes are known for helping unrelated members of their
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Australia’s scorching dry situations that caused its woodland and fields for the bush fires that have been ravaging the country since September is likely to continue, scientists warn. Climate change has probably made the situation worse. Scientists say that the fire risk in Australia remains high. Dan Pydynowski, a senior meteorologist at AccuWeather, said Southeastern Australia’s “unusually dry” conditions
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The diagonal lines in this image taken at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, show light reflected from Starlink satellites launched by SpaceX.Credit: Victoria Girgis/Lowell Observatory Honolulu, Hawaii The aerospace company SpaceX launched 60 of its Starlink broadband-internet satellites into orbit on 6 January — including one, called DarkSat, that is partially painted black. The
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Professional firearms experts may shoot more than 10,000 camels amid the devastating wildfires spreading across Australia to save them from drinking an excessive amount of water in the drought-afflicted country. The cull started on Wednesday, January 8, following an order from aboriginal leaders in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) lands following complaints that the animals were entering
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Cataglyphis ants use astonishing navigational techniques to find their way back to the nest after foraging.Credit: agefotostock/Alamy Desert Navigator: The Journey of an Ant Rüdiger Wehner Harvard University Press (2020) The fear of getting lost and being unable to find our way home is woven into the stories we hear as children: it can haunt
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Credit: CalypsoArt/Shutterstock Male scientists and other employees of some US federal agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), earn more money than their female counterparts. A study published in the American Journal of Sociology finds that this wage gap is largely due to hiring methods that circumvent rules
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(Photo : Reuters)The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant as seen before an explosion. Handout satellite image taken on March 14, 2011 and released on December 24, 2019 by Maxar Technologies. The local government unveiled its plan to make the Fukushima fully dependent on renewable energy. Eleven solar and 10 wind farms will be constructed on
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Neuroscientist Kenneth S. Kosik.Credit: Sonia Fernandez As a physician–scientist, many of my colleagues were surprised when I moved my laboratory from the Boston Longwood campus at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Massachusetts to the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), where there is neither a medical school nor a university-affiliated hospital. More than a few
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Credit: Getty Agency William Gibson Berkley (2020) With a breezy “Here we go,” Eunice enters the room — and the third page of William Gibson’s speculative novel Agency. I instantly liked her. Resourceful, fast-talking and street-smart, Eunice is on a serious mission: to give the world a fair chance to fend off the end of
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In a world that seems overwhelmed by potentially infinite plastic waste, are biodegradables the final solution? Probably not. But it isn’t effortless. The industry remains debating what “biodegradable” actually means. And a few plastics made from fossil fuels will biodegrade, while some plant-based “bioplastics” won’t. Biodegradable plastics are around since the late 1980s. They initially
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Tuberculosis is the deadliest human infection, killing 1.5 million people in 2018 alone (go.nature.com/2kbuiq). It is widely accepted that an effective vaccine against the bacterium responsible, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, would be the most practical way to control the disease. However, the pathogen is often able to resist the immune responses elicited by vaccination. This has raised
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This wonderful and peaceful small seaside town nestles in a sheltered spot on Spain’s eastern coast known as the Costa Blanca, named after it’s a multitude of beaches with fine, clean and warm sand. It is well known amongst discerning holidaymakers and ex-pats from places such as the UK, Germany and the Netherlands, for being
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Contaminated water (dark) in the Dongjiang River in Guangzhou, China, in 2008. A nationwide crackdown on water pollution has led to cleaner rivers and lakes. Credit: China Photos/Getty Environmental sciences 03 January 2020 A far-reaching effort to restore lakes and rivers to health finds success in some areas. China’s sweeping campaign to cleanse filthy lakes
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(Photo : Flickr)The larvae of screwworm flies eat flesh of a living animal or sometimes, even human. Millions of flies were produced weekly by this fly breeding facility at the east of the Panama Canal. And the said establishment is jointly operated by the Panamanian and United States government. But before you start making conspiracy
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He Jiankui stunned the world when he declared that he’d created the first gene-edited babies.Credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP/Shutterstock A Chinese court has sentenced He Jiankui, the biophysicist who announced that he had created the world’s first gene-edited babies, to three years in prison for “illegal medical practice”, and handed down shorter sentences to two colleagues who
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Alert: Recycled plastic is now in the trend. Fashion brands-particularly in the direct-to-consumer space-began rolling out products made from discarded plastic over the last few years. But one area in which plastic has taken off is footwear. Brands like Adidas, Veja, and Rothy’s are just among those companies incorporating materials made of recycled plastic in
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The Huaynaputina volcano in Peru spewed out up to 14 cubic kilometres of material when it erupted in 1600. Credit: Jean-Claude Thouret Volcanology 03 January 2020 The explosive outburst in what is now Peru was much bigger than scientists had realized. Scientists re-examining a South American volcano’s 1600 eruption have found that it was among
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Engineered immune cells called CAR-T cells (smaller orbs) attack a lung-cancer cell in this artificially coloured image. Credit: Steve Gschmeissner/SPL Cancer 02 January 2020 Vaccine drives growth of T cells engineered to attack cancer cells, according to experiments in mice. People with several types of blood cancer have reaped enormous benefits — including long-term remission
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In this Article, a coding mistake occurred when calculating (-frac{Delta ,mathrm{ln},{rm{COD}}}{Delta ,mathrm{ln},{R}_{{rm{e}}}})and (frac{Delta ,mathrm{ln},{rm{LWP}}}{Delta ,mathrm{ln},{rm{CDNC}}}), in which COD denotes the cloud optical depth; Re denotes the cloud droplet effective radius; LWP denotes the liquid water path; and CDNC denotes the cloud droplet number concentration. The natural logarithm of those cloud properties was mistakenly taken before,
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What’s in your beauty regimen? Are you tired of trying various trends, some that tend to be nothing short of fads? Well, from physical fitness, dietary measures, cosmetic procedures, to alternative medicine, some that could be too unusual for your taste, dealing with your skincare challenges, especially premature aging signs, can, at times, prove to
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Atoms in molecules oscillate when irradiated by infrared light. The particular light frequencies that drive these vibrations are absorbed by molecules, and depend on the molecules’ chemical structure and environment. The infrared absorption spectrum of a sample can therefore be used as a molecular fingerprint by which to characterize its chemical composition. This has made
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More than half of Earth’s rivers freeze over every year. These frozen rivers support important transportation networks for communities and industries located at high latitudes. Ice cover also regulates the amount of greenhouse gasses released from rivers into Earth’s atmosphere. A new study from researchers in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department
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Inevitably, the robots rebelled and took over the park. It was like something out of an old sci-fi movie. Her death was going to be a cliché. She’d taken refuge in an abandoned maintenance building, sniffling in the dust and dark under an old workbench, hidden behind a tangle of mouldering robot limbs. Across the
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One of five water-reuse plants in Singapore, which together supply about 40% of the nation’s water for drinking and other uses.Credit: Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Drinkable water is becoming increasingly scarce. Population growth, pollution and climate change mean that more cities are being forced to search for unconventional water sources1. In a growing number of places, drinking
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