Nature

Bonobo mother Marie is engulfed by biological daughters Marina and Margaux (left and right), aged 5 and 2, and adopted daughter Flora (lower middle), aged almost 3. Credit: Nahoko Tokuyama Animal behaviour 18 March 2021 Bonobo mums open their arms to outsider orphans Two female bonobos adopted youngsters from another troop — an unprecedented behaviour
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A recent report from the federal parliament proposes registration of cats, nighttime regulations, and spaying.Christine Ellis does not like untamed cats. As an ancient Warlpiri ranger in central Australia’s Great Sandy desert at Newhaven Wildlife Sanctuary, she is aware of what they can do to local animals in Australia. (Photo : Kelvin Valerio) Untamed Cats
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Opalescent inshore squid is some of the most experienced shapeshifters on the planet. These curious cephalopods are covered in a special skin that can absolutely jingle to a kaleidoscope of colors. Researchers have long been captivated by the remarkable disguise and communication of this squid. A new study has taken scientists even closer to finding
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Listen to the latest science news, with Nick Petrić Howe and Shamini Bundell. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:43 AI Debater After thousands of years of human practise, it’s still not clear what makes a good argument. Despite this, researchers have been developing computer programs that can
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A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm Robert J. Lefkowitz with Randy Hall Pegasus (2021) Cardiologist-turned-biochemist, Robert Lefkowitz won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for showing how adrenaline works through stimulation of specific receptors, with huge implications for drug discovery. Yet he calls himself “an accidental scientist”, because he trained as a
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Scientists now realize that the chemicals used in various consumer products are more harmful than commonly believed. It’s a smart idea to become mindful of these products and take measures to eradicate them wherever possible, but health and wellbeing aren’t just about food and exercise. It’s also about minimizing exposure to dangerous products. A harmful
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Taking responsibility for the way you behave towards others can improve your professional relationships.Credit: Misha Friedman/Getty The cognitive-intelligence quotient, known as IQ, is an important factor in determining your reasoning ability, but a high IQ score is not the whole story when it comes to thriving professionally (and personally). Another dimension of human intelligence, known
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The Amazon rainforest of French Guiana constantly buzzes and hums, but I keep my focus on the trees. In this picture, taken in November 2020 — the most recent time I was there — I’m walking through a dense forest at the Paracou research station near the coastal town of Kourou. I’m looking at drone
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Correction to: Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04738Published online 15 June 2006 In this Letter, there is an error in the analysis of data that affects some of the conclusions. The three main conclusions of the Letter were as follows. First, that the Heliconius heurippa wing pattern arose by hybridization between H. cydno cordula and H. m. melpomene, demonstrated
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Environmentalists sometimes use the terms “preservation” and “conservation” interchangeably without specifying what they say or why they use one over the other. Here’s a short rundown of the differences between the terms “preservation” and “conservation,” as well as any explanations why people choose one to the other. Both preservation and restoration are environmental protection processes,
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Around 1.8 million envenoming snake bites happen around the globe yearly, taking roughly 94,000 lives. In tropical regions, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, snakebites are regarded as a primary cause of death, mainly among farmers who confront snakes in their fields. (Photo : Pixabay) Approaches Taken to Combat Snakebites The World Health Organization
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Pain signals are transmitted to the brain through neurons similar to these in the spinal cord.Credit: Jose Calvo/Science Photo Library A gene-silencing technique based on CRISPR can relieve pain in mice, according to a study1. Although the therapy is still a long way from being used in humans, scientists say it is a promising approach
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Antibodies attacking a coronavirus particle (illustration).Credit: Juan Gaertner/SPL/Alamy Two clinical trials suggest that specific antibody treatments can prevent deaths and hospitalizations among people with mild or moderate COVID-19 — particularly those who are at high risk of developing severe disease. One study found that an antibody against the coronavirus developed by Vir Biotechnology in San
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Benjamin Thompson and Nidhi Subbaraman discuss the latest COVID-19 news. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been many open questions about how COVID-19 could impact pregnant people and their babies – confounded by a lack of data. But now, studies are finally starting
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Center of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Jaewoong Lee, Mark E. Robinson, Dewan Artadji, Teresa Sadras, Kadriye Nehir Cosgun, Lai N. Chan, Kohei Kume, Lars Klemm & Markus Müschen Department of Computational and Quantitative Medicine, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA Ning Ma & Nagarajan Vaidehi Department of Systems Biology, City of Hope
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In this webcast from Nature Careers’ webinar programme, which is now available to view on demand, scientists describe their experiences of working from home and looking after children while laboratories and offices were closed during pandemic lockdowns. What advice do they have for staying healthy and productive? Anne-Laure Mahul Mellier, a neurobiologist at the Swiss
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City life goes on, as footage of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang speaking at the National People’s Congress in Beijing is broadcast on March 5.Credit: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg/Getty Scientific and technological self-reliance takes centre stage in China’s latest five-year plan — a result of recent tensions with the United States and other Western nations spilling over into
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Hear the latest from the world of science, with Nick Petrić Howe and Shamini Bundell. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:47 Gravity, on the small scale This week, researchers have captured the smallest measurement of gravity on record, by measuring the pull between two tiny gold spheres.
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The study released in Proceedings journal of the Royal Society indicates that the oceanic creatures since Ediacaran era share genes with today’s animals, both humans. A geology professor at UC Riverside Mary Droser explained that none of these creatures had skeletons or heads. A lot of them likely appear like a three-dimensional bathmats on the seafloor
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The bacterium Streptococcus mutans (orange; artificially coloured) clings to teeth with the help of a film-forming molecule. Credit: Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library Microbiology 10 March 2021 A compound helps oral bacteria to hook up into sticky, decay-causing dental plaque. A newfound molecule helps bacteria to spread across the teeth in a crowded, sticky film —
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Yalda Afshar was about two months pregnant when reports of COVID-19 began to emerge in the United States in February last year. As an obstetrician managing high-risk pregnancies at the University of California, Los Angeles, Afshar knew that respiratory viruses are especially dangerous to pregnant women. There was very little data on the effects of
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Drawing blood as part of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, an egregious experiment that withheld treatment from hundreds of African American men.Credit: National Archives at Atlanta/NYT/Redux/eyevine Last December, after the US Federal Drug Administration signed off on the use of the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the first vaccinations began across the country, I began to get
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