Nature

A Long March-5 rocket carrying Chang’e 5 lifts off.Credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP/Shutterstock A Chinese spacecraft is on its way to the Moon after launching off the coast of Hainan Island, in southern China, this morning at 4:30 AM local time. Chang’e-5’s mission is to retrieve rocks from the Moon and return them to Earth. If successful,
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As chair of fire and structures at the University of Edinburgh, UK, I work in three laboratory spaces. We do everything from small-scale experiments on various building materials to see how easily they ignite or spread fire, to large-scale analyses of the load-bearing systems of skyscrapers using complex computer simulations. Around 2008, my group moved
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Carbon emissions in the US have been found to have decreased due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as published last week by the BNEF or BloombergNEF. The report quantified the COVID-19 viral pandemic’s impacts on the amount of carbon dioxide emissions in the US. This report estimated that the emissions produced this year will be lower by 9.2 percent compared to
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A coronavirus related to SARS-CoV-2 has been found in Shamel’s horseshoe bats captured in Cambodia in 2010.Credit: Merlin D. Tuttle/SPL Two lab freezers in Asia have yielded surprising discoveries. Researchers have told Nature they have found a coronavirus that is closely related to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the pandemic, in horseshoe bats stored in
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After a century, Antarctica’s blue whales have been seen in South Georgia once again after near extinction. Largest-known animal seen again The Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus), the largest known animal on the planet, is critically endangered. They have been seen in the waters near South Georgia Island near Antarctica, after nearly a hundred years of being nearly hunted
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In New Mexico, a lava tube shows evidence of Ancestral Puebloans surviving climate change by melting ice for their water needs. For over ten millennia, the people of the arid landscape of what is now western New Mexico have been famous for having unique architecture, complex societies, and political and economic systems.  Studying the ancient Puebloans In the El Malpais,
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Monarch caterpillars have been demonstrated to head-butt one another as they fight for scarce milkweed food supply. The dwindling food source causes the insects to become aggressive towards others, as observed by scientists in laboratory experiments. READ: Study Debunks Migration Mortality as Major Cause of Butterfly Monarch’s Population Decline Scarce food supply  To become a butterfly, Monarch caterpillars need
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A presentation is not a journal article — so don’t prepare for them in the same way.Credit: Getty In 20 years of coaching biomedical researchers on presentation techniques, I have continually been frustrated by scientists trying to make presentations as comprehensive as journal articles. Their thinking is understandable: “Better too much than too little, and
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The number of deaths across Central America and Colombia has reached more than 40 and the death toll is rising as rescuers race against time to reach far-flung areas that were isolated. Most of the dead were recorded in Nicaragua and Honduras. Honduran President and leaders from Central American Countries plead for aid. In Nicaragua, 160,000
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Kelsey Huntington, a pathology PhD student, applied her knowledge of the immune system in colorectal cancer to COVID-19 research.Credit: Kelsey Huntington As a postdoctoral researcher in disease ecology at the University of Montpellier, France, Amandine Gamble spent the first two months of 2019 hunting down unsuspecting albatrosses on the Falkland Islands. Gamble was finishing some
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Chlordecone is a chemical manufactured as a white powder used by Caribbean plantation workers in Martinique and Guadaloupe and applied under banana plantation trees as protection against insects. Cause of prostate cancer Ambroise Bertin is a banana plantation worker who worked with chlordecone for several years. He contracted prostate cancer, which is more common in his home in Martinique and Guadeloupe compared to any other place
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A copper collecting plate (long central structure) paired with a transparent, heat-trapping material (white strip, top) harvests enough solar heat to make steam. Credit: Lin Zhao Renewable energy 20 November 2020 A sunlight-powered device equipped with an a lightweight gel makes steam hot enough to kill dangerous microbes. An airy insulating material doubles the efficiency
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Volcanic eruptions burned coal and oil in what is now Siberia, which helped usher the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction Event or the “Great Dying.” The mass extinction Paleontologists termed the event like the Great Dying or Permian-Triassic mass extinction. This occurred approximately 252 million years in the past, where in the span of tens of millennia, 96% of every marine
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The invasive species Argentine tegu lizard has spread throughout Florida’s southern region and has even spilled over the US southeast. It poses a threat to farmers and native species. They have bred continuously in many states once they have escaped or have been released.  Argentine tegu behavior  Argentine tegus come from South America. They are known to be
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At least 30 people were dead as Hurricane Iota, the strongest Atlantic hurricane of the year, batters Central America. Deaths were from Nicaragua, Honduras, Colombian, Panama, and El Salvador. More than 60,000 were evacuated even after Iota struck Nicaragua. Same path as Hurricane Eta  Hurricane Iota shared almost the same path as that of Hurricane Eta, which struck on
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Albatrosses and petrels are being intentionally killed or mutilated by fishermen to free them from hooks in the Southwest Atlantic. An international team of researchers, including Dr. Alex Bond, Senior Curator in Charge of Birds at the Natural History Museum, documented some of the horrific injuries that albatrosses and petrels are enduring at the fishermen’s hands.
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The onset of any type of cancer brings a feeling of dread. The body that had so loyally served you, give or take a few aches and pains, suddenly threatens to kill you. Therapeutic advances have lowered the stakes considerably for several malignancies, including breast cancer, prostate cancer and leukaemia. But lung cancer remains a
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Listen to a special episode on facial recognition technology, with Benjamin Thompson and Richard Van Noorden. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 03:24 Standing up against ‘smart cities’ Cities across the globe are installing thousands of surveillance cameras equipped with facial recognition technology. Although marketed as a way
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Renowned marine researcher Daniel Pauly believes that future fishing practices will be through artisanal fishing boats with subsidies to industrial fishing fleets eliminated. Pauly, a University of British Columbia professor, says that fish product stocks are a worldwide problem that is threatening food security because of the excessive fishing effort of subsidized fleets. According to him, the fisheries industry will improve as subsidies are ended and the politicians
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Youthful sleep in ageing people is linked to a lower prevalence of diabetes and other health conditions. Credit: Raquel Maria Carbonell Pagola/LightRocket/Getty Ageing 17 November 2020 Older people with ‘young’ sleep patterns have more robust cognition than those whose rest is typical for their age. Older people with sleep patterns like those of younger people
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Soft Matter Tom McLeish Oxford Univ. Press (2020) Freeze a rose in liquid nitrogen then tap it with a hammer, and the petals shatter. “Its softness is a function of its temperature, not just its molecular constituents and structure,” observes theoretical physicist Tom McLeish, one of the researchers who founded ‘soft-matter physics’ in the 1990s.
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Mission scientists monitor the spacecraft Cassini as it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere.Credit: Joel Kowsky/NASA Shaping Science: Organizations, Decisions, and Culture on NASA’s Teams Janet Vertesi Univ. Chicago Press (2020) In 25 years of covering US planetary science, I’ve become used to seeing certain faces in press briefings, at conferences and on webcasts presenting discoveries from
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Moderna’s phase III vaccine trial has enrolled about 30,000 participants.Credit: Hans Pennink/AP/Shutterstock They say good news comes in threes. For the third time in a week, a coronavirus vaccine developer has reported preliminary results suggesting that its vaccine is highly effective. Today, biotech company Moderna in Cambridge, Massachusetts, reported that its RNA-based vaccine is more
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For more than two decades, I have been working to improve several staple food crops in Africa, including bananas, plantains, cassavas and yams. As principal scientist and a plant biotechnologist at the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture in Nairobi, I aim to develop varieties that are resistant to pests and diseases such as bacterial wilt,
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Allison Gargaro, the meteorologist of Fox 35, says that Hurricane Iota, now a hurricane Category 2 storm, is quickly gaining strength as it passes over the warm waters of the Caribbean, in its approach towards Central America. Potential effects It reached Category 2 status on the evening of Sunday. The NHC or National Hurricane Center’s forecasters warn that it may bring
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Zero-carbon or green hydrogen is a source of renewable energy that may supplement solar and wind power. Hydrogen combustion produces water as a by-product. For decades, this made it attractive as a source of sought-after zero-carbon energy. However, the old way of creating this element is far from being so, for it involves exposing fossil fuels to steam.  The ‘colors’ of hydrogen The process
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There is a current shortage of glass for solar panels needed to mitigate climate change. The future production of PV glass has been seen to be fewer by 20 to 30% than the projected demand in 2021. Also, the price of glass has increased by 71% from July this year, which negatively affects the economy of solar power production, demand, and supply.
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Nearly half of all thermal coal-fired power plants plan to defy the Paris Agreement pledge to mitigate climate change. Many companies in the coal industry have long-term plans opposite the commitments on mitigating the rise in global climate temperatures. A report says that they intend to deepen further their involvement in coal in the years to come. It identified 935
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A second national lockdown began in England on 5 November.Credit: Hollie Adams/AFP/Getty Epidemiologists predicting the spread of COVID-19 should adopt climate-modelling methods to make forecasts more reliable, say computer scientists who have spent months auditing one of the most influential models of the pandemic. In a study that was uploaded to the preprint platform Research
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DNA can now be used to revive extinct species of animals and plants whose genome sequences may be used to resurrect species that have been wiped out.  Considerations and obstacles It is indeed possible, but there are technical obstacles, ethics, ecological implications, and even financial concerns. Reviving extinct species requires many considerations. We should ask if the species in question
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The new coronavirus spreads rapidly among mink.Credit: Ole Jensen/Getty Health officials in Denmark have released genetic and experimental data on a cluster of SARS-CoV-2 mutations circulating in farmed mink and people, days after they announced the mutations could jeopardize the effectiveness of potential COVID-19 vaccines. News of the mutations prompted the Danish Prime Minister Mette
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An effort to sample lakes beneath Iceland’s Vatnajökull ice cap (pictured) triggered a deluge into a nearby river. Credit: Benedikt Gunnar Ófeigsson/Icelandic Meteorological Office Hydrology 13 November 2020 A borehole in an ice cap gives researchers an unexpected close-up of a glacial flood, or jökulhlaup. Researchers drilling a borehole through a glacier inadvertently triggered an
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A law is being proposed to help stop the public from purchasing food produced on lands that are illegally logged rainforest areas to mitigate climate change. Companies in the UK are being sought to be prohibited from selling products that have violated local laws on forest protection and protection of other areas of nature. READ: Aerial Bridges: Overpasses of Threatened
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