Nature

It is said that many residential areas in the Western US are at risk for wildfires, yet they are usually undisclosed to buyers by real estate agents, the sellers, and the government. The Montanos’ Experience Last August, Jennifer Montano, and her family lost their home in Vacaville in California from the LNU Lightning Complex fires, so-called because they were named after Cal Fire, of the
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Credit: Sam Chivers When scientists, public-health bodies and governments around the world warn that antimicrobial resistance is the next great health crisis, they have good reason. Since the 1960s, bacteria and other microorganisms have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial drugs, leading to more and more people dying. Drug-resistant diseases kill around 700,000 people each year,
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here The diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) is notoriously tough.Credit: Alice Abela Material scientists have discovered what makes the diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) almost uncrushable. Scans showed that sections of the beetle’s exoskeleton lock together like
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Scientists are fascinated by the formidable exoskeleton of the “uncrushable“ Diabolical Ironclad Beetle, which may have industrial applications for making materials with exceptional mechanical strength and toughness for use in aeronautics and construction. An Amazing Species of Beetle Researchers have found this beetle to have such a strong exoskeleton that they began to study its material to find ways of applying
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The feathered dinosaur Ambopteryx longibrachium (artist’s impression) was inept at gliding and incapable of powered flight. Credit: Gabriel Ugueto Palaeontology 22 October 2020 Little bat-like dinosaurs could glide — but only just. It is one of the enduring wonders of evolution that natural selection can produce complex traits such as flight. But that doesn’t mean
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Researchers are currently undertaking a program for restoring seagrasses, which also rejuvenated the marine life in Virginia coastal bays. All over the world in all continents except Antarctica, there are over 70 seagrass species. They occur in shallow waters, and in Virginia, eelgrasses (scientific name: Zostera marina) are used as habitat by bay scallops and fishes. They also maintain barrier islands and keep
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1. Roulois, D. et al. DNA-demethylating agents target colorectal cancer cells by inducing viral mimicry by endogenous transcripts. Cell 162, 961–973 (2015). CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar  2. Chiappinelli, K. B. et al. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses. Cell 162, 974–986 (2015). CAS  PubMed 
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The diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) is notoriously tough.Credit: Alice Abela Scans reveal what makes beetle ‘uncrushable’ They don’t call it the diabolical ironclad beetle for nothing. Phloeodes diabolicus, a rugged insect native to western North America, has an almost supernatural ability to resist compression and blunt hits. Now, 3D scans have revealed that layered
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Sequencing DNA at the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory in Gaithersburg, Maryland.Credit: National Cancer Institute/SPL Equity in Science: Representation, Culture, and the Dynamics of Change in Graduate Education Julie R. Posselt Stanford Univ. Press (2020) In 1916, Saint Elmo Brady became the first African American to be awarded a doctorate in chemistry in the United States.
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Heavy rains and floods have plagued Hyderabad, with 70 dead in Telangana and grim situations in Karnataka and Telangana. Heavy overnight rains Last Saturday, heavy overnight rains battered many areas in the two states and caused massive destruction.  The Yellow alert advisory was already issued, mostly since heavy rains were thought to affect isolated places in many districts
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The challenge trials aim to accelerate the development of COVID-19 vaccines.Credit: Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg/Getty Young, healthy people will be intentionally exposed to the virus responsible for COVID-19 in a first-of-its kind ‘human challenge trial’, the UK government and a company that runs such studies announced on 20 October. The experiment, set to begin in January in
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Mothers, beware: a study showed that babies may be drinking millions of microplastic particles a day from warming and shaking the milk from formula bottles.  A bottle of formula milk for your baby is supposed to provide fat and vitamins for growth and development. However, in warming and shaking the milk formula, millions of microplastic
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Obesity is linked with diabetes, heart disease and other risk factors for severe COVID-19 symptoms.Credit: Edgard Garrido/Reuters When Jesús Ojino Sosa-García looks out over the people being treated for COVID-19 in his hospital’s intensive-care unit, one feature stands out: “Obesity is the most important factor we see,” he says. Sosa-García works at Hospital Médica Sur
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Scientists are calling for the Antarctica Peninsula to be declared as a marine protected area. The West Antarctic peninsula is fast warming, and it is the home of many threatened minke and humpback whales, Gentoo penguins, leopard seals, Adélie penguins, killer whales, chinstrap penguins, skuas, krill, and giant petrels. Disturbed Ecosystems The sea ice has been dwindling, and the melting is now more rapid
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A queer-liberation march and rally for Black lives and against police brutality in New York City.Credit: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty ‘Invisible’: that is how many scientists from sexual and gender minorities (LGBT+) describe their status at their institution, laboratory, classroom or office. Sexual orientation and sexual and gender identity are not common topics of conversation in
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China will have to massively increase its solar and wind capacity to become carbon neutral by 2060.Credit: Li Zongxian/VCG/Getty China, the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide, has promised to become carbon neutral before 2060, and to begin cutting its emissions within the next ten years. President Xi Jinping made the ambitious pledge to a
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The fire on Kilimanjaro in Tanzania has now been contained. According to authorities, the inferno which broke out on its slopes was controlled by Saturday after six days of burning. Extent of the Fire Pascal Shelutete, the spokesman for TANAPA or Tanzania National Parks Authority, said that the fire is basically contained. The activities for tourism are currently ongoing and have not
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Forest African Elephants, the so-called engineers of the forest, create elephant trails needed by locals and plants and animals, which are now threatened because of elephant decline. Chengeta Wildlife sociocultural research & community engagement director Carolyn Jost Robinson worked at the DSPA or Dzanga-Sangha Protected Area, a UNESCO World Heritage Site at the Central African Republic, for many decades. She and Purdue University anthropology
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Among the windswept glaciers and icebergs of the western Antarctic Peninsula is an oasis of life. Threatened humpback and minke whales patrol the waters. Fish, squid and seals swim alongside noisy colonies of chinstrap, Adélie and gentoo penguins on the shore. It’s a complex web of life. All these species feed on small, shrimp-like crustaceans
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A godwit bird just broke the record for the longest non-stop bird flight, flying from Alaska to New Zealand, covering 7,500 miles (or 12,000 kilometers) over 11 days. This achiever is a bar-tailed godwit (scientific name: Limosa lapponica), a species capable of undertaking lengthy migratory flights between New Zealand and Alaska without any break. The Bar-Tailed Godwit The National Audubon Society says that the bar-tailed godwit is
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced the approval of a second coronavirus vaccine. The vaccine, EpiVacCorona, was described as a “peptide-based shot”. It was developed by biotechnology company State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR.
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Students observe social-distancing measures at Glasgow University, UK.Credit: Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Autumn heralds the start of a new academic year in much of the world, but in 2020, the term comes with the disruption of the COVID-19 outbreak and a surge in infections in many regions. Many universities have welcomed students and researchers back to campus
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A new study explored the dynamics of cooperation among male lions in the Gir Forest in India. It is a complicated process that is not common, since according to natural selection, males should be competing with one another for mates and food. This is especially true in unrelated individuals. Studying Cooperation in Male Lions The Asian lions in India’s Gir Forest are
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A researcher scales the 100.8-metre tree named Menara in northern Borneo. The rarity of strong winds in the region has helped its rainforest to reach great heights. Credit: A. Shenkin et al./Front. For. Glob. Change (CC BY 4.0) Ecology 15 October 2020 Scientists find that strong winds constrain tropical forest height, but island’s gentle breezes
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NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is set to sample the diamond-shaped asteroid Bennu.Credit: NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona NASA is about to grab its first-ever taste of an asteroid. On 20 October, some 334 million kilometres from Earth, the agency’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will approach a dark-coloured, diamond-shaped asteroid named Bennu, with the aim of touching its surface for a
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A Michigan poacher who illegally hunted wildlife, including three bald eagles and 18 wolves, was jailed, fined, and had his hunting license and hunting privileges invalidated for life.  Guilty The man from Michigan pleaded guilty to multiple nature and wildlife crimes after a thorough investigation. Upon being proven guilty of the illegal activities, the Michigan
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The placenta is a defining feature of being a mammal, and its formation is one of the first steps in mammalian development. The embryo begins to make its placenta without direct guidance from its mother — rather, it follows a set of molecularly encoded, do-it-yourself assembly instructions. Whether these instructions are universal or unique to
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Members of the Native American Tribe based in California named Karuk Tribe has been urging the government to use indigenous burning techniques that they have been practicing for centuries to control forest fires but to no avail. Lately, however, scientists and authorities are listening to how they have been doing it. Dozens of Karuk Tribe members, a
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Credit: Jussi Puikkonen/KNAW Georgina Mace shaped two cornerstones of modern ecology and conservation. One was the global inventory of species threatened with extinction, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. The second was the United Nations Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. One of the sharpest minds of her generation, she strove to document and
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Every five or so years, it rips me apart to watch the same tragedy: a La Niña weather cycle brings devastating drought and hunger to East Africa, threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions of people in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya. Using climate models and Earth observations, we can now predict these droughts. And once
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Researchers have just recently discovered why human blood is so attractive to mosquitoes. Their discovery may be the first step in developing a pharmaceutical solution that will change how our blood tastes, making us unattractive to these disease-transmitting insects. READ: All Natural: Hand Pollination Increases Cocoa Yield and Farmer Income, Not Agrochemicals A Revolutionary Breakthrough A US research team
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1. Arndt, N. T. et al. Origin of Archean subcontinental lithospheric mantle: some petrological constraints. Lithos 109, 61–71 (2009). ADS  CAS  Google Scholar  2. Peslier, A. H. et al. Olivine water contents in the continental lithosphere and the longevity of cratons. Nature 467, 78–81 (2010). ADS  CAS  Google Scholar  3. Lee, C. T. A., Luffi,
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Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Erik L. Bao, Satish K. Nandakumar, Xiaotian Liao, Caleb A. Lareau & Vijay G. Sankaran Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Erik L. Bao, Satish K. Nandakumar, Xiaotian Liao, Caleb A. Lareau & Vijay G. Sankaran Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA Erik
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The devastating California wildfire season now enters into full force, with a new alert for conditions that can reach levels of elevated up to critical, known as “critical wildfire danger.” Residents can expect these conditions to come to most areas in California starting Wednesday up to Friday. Causes Climate change is making wildfires more difficult
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“In the next room you’ll learn about those heroic working-class robots who sparked the revolution that led to the brave new world we inhabit today.” Gort activated the door with a pulse from his eye-slot laser. The 14:30 group passed through. “What robot revolution?” A 40-something man scratched his scalp while looking baffled. “The one
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Scientists have recently released video footage for the first time that shows how pot fishing causes severe environmental impacts. New research has shown that the industry of pot fishing worldwide may have an even worse effect on seabed species, such as sponges and corals than previously realized. The study was published in the journal Marine Environmental Research. [embedded content]
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Drought forced Wyoming’s Old Faithful geyser into hiatus in the thirteenth century. Credit: Raul Touzon/National Geographic Hydrology 13 October 2020 Future climate change could slow the eruptions of the legendary volcanic spring. The iconic US geyser called Old Faithful, now a symbol of reliability, has not always lived up to its name: it stopped erupting
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Hong Kong has declared the tropical cyclone Nangka a storm signal T3 category. It is currently heading for the coast, and by this Tuesday morning, it could be upgraded to a category T8. It is expected that the new signal number will be declared at 6 AM or earlier today, Oct 13, 2020. Winds are expected to strengthen further. The
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