RESEARCH SUMMARY 14 May 2021 Breastfeeding influences the neonatal virome The first viruses to colonize the infant gut are shown to arise from bacteria, with human-cell viruses colonizing the gut later, at around four months of age. Exclusive and partial breastfeeding were associated with fewer human viruses in the gut of infants compared with formula-feeding
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WASHINGTON — A Rocket Lab Electron rocket failed to reach orbit May 15 when its second stage engine shut down seconds after ignition, the second launch failure in less than a year for the company. The Electron lifted off from Rocket Lab’s Launch Complex 1 in New Zealand at 7:11 a.m. Eastern. The liftoff was
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Taken from the May 2021 issue of Physics World. Members of the Institute of Physics can enjoy the full issue via the Physics World app. A short story by Kevlin Henney “Hmm, that seems a bit convenient.” Mel’s image appears, along with Ashley’s and Taylor’s. “So, we’re identifying Lou as the bot?” Taylor grins. “Steady
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People wear protective face masks outside Salesforce Tower in New York City. Noam Galai | Getty Images Cloudera exited its downtown San Francisco office early last year with plans to sublease the space and move its employees south to the software company’s Silicon Valley headquarters. But the pandemic left the company with nobody to take
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An uncrewed Chinese spacecraft successfully landed on the surface of Mars on Saturday, state news agency Xinhua reported, making China the second space-faring nation after the United States to land on the Red Planet. The Tianwen-1 spacecraft landed on a site on a vast plain known as Utopia Planitia, “leaving a Chinese footprint on Mars
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Navigating the future: the letter from Albert Einstein to Glyn Davys (click to expand). (Courtesy: Dyer et al. 2021, J Comp Physiol A/The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) A 1949 letter sent by Albert Einstein to the British radar researcher Glyn Davys shows that the great physicist believed new insights into physics could come from studying
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Storage tanks at a Colonial Pipeline Inc. facility in Avenel, New Jersey, on Wednesday, May 12, 2021. Mark Kauzlarich | Bloomberg | Getty Images The recent ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline was an all too familiar story to businesses across the United States. The pipeline, which supplies fuel to some 50 million people from the
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Genomic analysis identified starch-loving Streptococcus sanguinis bacteria (artificially coloured) in the mouths of modern humans and Neanderthals, but not in chimpanzees’ mouths. Credit: National Infection Service/Science Photo Library Microbiome 14 May 2021 Microbes in Neanderthals’ mouths reveal their carb-laden diet Gunk on ancient teeth yields bacterial DNA, allowing scientists to trace the oral microbiome’s evolution.
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By Allison Kubo Hutchison Although today it may be easy to buy your maternal figure an orchid for Mother’s Day from the grocery store, in the 1800s, the acquisition of orchids was a dangerous, competitive and lucrative business. Orchids, which are generally tropical plants, grow across the globe and their family makes up 6-11% of
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WASHINGTON — The next launch of Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket will be the second mission where the company attempts to recover the vehicle’s first stage as part of its efforts to reuse the booster. An Electron rocket is scheduled to launch no earlier than 6 a.m. Eastern May 15 from Rocket Lab’s Launch Complex 1
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Getting things done in corporate sustainability is easier said than, well, done. Lofty goals and good intentions don’t automatically yield reduced impacts, and the most brilliant environmental, social and governance (ESG) strategy means little if it can’t be implemented. Often the most difficult aspect of a corporate sustainability professional’s job isn’t conducting materiality assessments, developing
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WASHINGTON — A Japanese billionaire best known for buying a SpaceX Starship flight around the moon will go to space first on a Russian Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station, two months after a Russian actress and director visit the station. Space tourism company Space Adventures and the Russian space agency Roscosmos announced May
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Japanese billionaire entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant Yozo Hirano will be the next tourists to travel to the International Space Station (ISS), Russia’s space agency Roscosmos said Thursday. Maezawa and Hirano will travel aboard a Russian “Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft that is scheduled for launch on December 8, 2021 from the Baikonur cosmodrome” in Kazakhstan,
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When the thought of a tornado comes to your mind, a classic cone-shaped funnel likely follows. But tornadoes can take countless shapes, displaying strange and terrifying characteristics and behaviors. Thereby making these already threatening monsters scarier. Here are some of the most dreadful tornadoes and circulations of wind to scan the skies for. Also, learn
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SAN FRANCISCO – Axelspace, the Japanese firm planning to offer daily global optical imagery, raised 2.58 billion Japanese yen ($23.8 million) in a Series C investment round announced May 14 in Tokyo, May 13 in the United States. The Space Frontier Fund managed by Sparx Innovation for Future Co. provided funding alongside other venture capital
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The sustainable/responsible investing (SRI) market is over $30 trillion and growing faster than traditional investments. Over the past 20 years, SRI and the sustainability movement in general have provided large benefits to business and society. But in spite of this good work, environmental and social conditions are declining rapidly in many areas. Clearly new approaches
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People leave university science for a variety of reasons.Credit: Zen Rial/Getty The make-up of the scientific workforce at US universities does not reflect the diversity of the country, data show: Black, Latino and Indigenous people are under-represented on every rung of the academic ladder1, from graduate student to full professor. They are also underfunded: both
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UK-based startup Sylvera is using satellite, radar and lidar data-fuelled machine learning to bolster transparency around carbon offsetting projects in a bid to boost accountability and credibility — applying independent ratings to carbon offsetting projects. The ratings are based on proprietary data sets it’s developed in conjunction with scientists from research organisations including UCLA, the
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Researchers within Elekta’s MR-Linac Consortium are opening up new frontiers in cancer treatment through the collaborative development of biological image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (BIGART) Game-changer: the Elekta Unity MR-Linac provides an enabling platform for clinical trials of biological image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. (Courtesy: Elekta) The Elekta Unity MR-Linac is among a new generation of MR-guided radiotherapy (MR/RT)
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Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg said Thursday that the ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline, the operator of the country’s largest fuel pipeline, has been a “wakeup call” for U.S. cybersecurity vulnerability. Colonial is still struggling with a cybersecurity attack that forced its entire system offline on Friday and triggered widespread fuel shortages across the East Coast.
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Listen to the latest science news, with Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:45 A brain interface to type out thoughts Researchers have developed a brain-computer interface that is able to read brain signals from people thinking about handwriting, and translate them into
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WASHINGTON — Ongoing work to address a problem seen on two previous Ariane 5 launches has kept that launch vehicle grounded for months and could delay the high-profile launch of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope later this year. The Ariane 5, one of the world’s most reliable launch vehicles, last launched in August 2020, placing
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It feels almost quaint to remember way back when “80 by 50” — an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 — was a bold goal for a company or government entity to make. It was seen by many as audacious, possibly unachievable, but still a necessary target. The “way back when” in
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Einstein was right: artist’s impression of a neutron-star merger. (Courtesy: NASA) Multimessenger observations of neutron stars have been used by astrophysicists in the US to put Einstein’s general theory of relativity to the test – and the 106 year old theory has passed with flying colours. A neutron star is the dense, core remnant of
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